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PFAS

  • DNR Notified Of Possible Separate Contamination Issue At Marinette Facility That Has Paused PFAS Treatment

    Wisconsin DNR news release

    The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources is investigating a separate contamination issue found in one of the ditches downstream of the JCI/Tyco Fire Technology Center in Marinette, Wisconsin.

    Type: News Release

  • DNR To Host Online Listening Sessions Sept. 16 Regarding PFAS Deer Tissue Sampling And Other Investigation Activities In Marinette, Peshtigo And Surrounding Communities

    Wisconsin DNR news release

    The Department of Natural Resources is holding online listening sessions on Wednesday, Sept. 16 to discuss the state’s newly issued “do not eat deer liver” advisory for the area and to seek public input on PFAS contamination in Marinette, Peshtigo and surrounding communities.

    Type: News Release

  • DNR And DHS Issue Do Not Eat Advisory For Deer Liver In Five-Mile Area Surrounding JCI/Tyco Site In Marinette

    A map of Marinette and Peshtigo

    The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) released a report today detailing findings of PFAS in the liver of deer harvested and analyzed from the JCI/Tyco Fire Technology Center in Marinette, Wis.

    Type: News Release

  • Elevated PFAS Levels Found In Ditch Downstream Of JCI/Tyco

    Wisconsin DNR news release

    Today, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) received analytical sample results from surface water monitoring conducted in July by Johnson Controls, Inc. (JCI) and its subsidiary Tyco Fire Products, LP (Tyco) associated with the ongoing PFAS investigation at their Fire Technology Center in Marinette, Wisconsin.

    Type: News Release

  • New Restrictions On PFAS-Containing Firefighting Foams Effective Sept. 1

    Wisconsin DNR news release

    MADISON, Wis. - 2019 Wisconsin Act 101, published on Feb. 6, 2020 and codified in Wisconsin Statutes section 299.48, implements measures that mitigate the discharge of PFAS-containing firefighting foam into the environment, and in doing so supports efforts by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and fire departments to protect the health and safety of Wisconsin residents and the firefighting community.

    Type: News Release

  • DNR Publishes Results Of Firefighting Department PFAS Survey

    Firefighters use firefighting foam to extinguish a fire.

    As requested by Gov. Tony Evers in the 2019-2021 Biennial Budget, the DNR conducted a survey of the state's fire departments to determine their use of PFAS-containing, or fluorinated, firefighting foams. This survey was designed to help the DNR better understand how much, how often and why fluorinated foam is used across Wisconsin.

    Type: News Release

  • Public Input and Meetings

    The DNR will continue to seek public input on PFAS investigation, contamination and cleanup issues. There are a variety of ways to give public input and public meetings are held throughout the year.

    Public Meetings

    All meetings held by the DNR are published in the DNR Public Meetings Calendar. Details about specific sites, stakeholder groups and initiatives are available on dedicated webpages.

    Type: Content page

  • PFAS Investigation and Cleanup

    Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) may enter the environment and result in contamination to groundwater, surface water, soil and/or sediment. In Wisconsin, persons who own properties that are the source of PFAS contamination, or who are responsible for discharges of PFAS to the environment, are responsible for taking appropriate actions. Those individuals must also immediately notify the state, conduct a site investigation, determine the appropriate clean-up standards for the PFAS compounds in each media impacted (e.g., soil, groundwater, surface water and sediment) and conduct the necessary response actions.

    Type: Content page

  • Environmental and Health Impacts of PFAS

    Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a large group of human-made chemicals that have been used in industry and consumer products worldwide since the 1950s.

    PFAS do not occur naturally and are widespread in the environment. They are found in people, wildlife and fish all over the world. Some PFAS can stay in peoples' bodies a long time and do not break down easily in the environment.

    Type: Content page

  • PFAS Contacts

    Contact the following DNR staff if you have questions about PFAS.

    Type: Content page

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