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Pea gravel blanket

Waterway protection

Pea Gravel Blanket

 

Certain materials may be allowed to be used to create areas for swimming and enjoying the shoreline. Regardless of the material you choose, a permit is required to place sand, pea gravel, etc. on the beds of public waters (any area below the Ordinary High Water Mark (OHWM)).

The placement of pea gravel is only allowed on lakes and not on a stream, creek or river bed.

Placement of sand on most shorelines is not allowed, because it tends to move from the site, and can impact fish and wildlife habitat.

Placement of pea gravel is not allowed in wetlands or sensitive habitat areas of lakes.

Do I Need a Permit?

This is a text link version of our pea gravel blanket interactive question and answer module. If you see this message, you currently have JavaScript disabled or are in compatibility mode while using Internet Explorer. This text version is here to help you understand if you need a permit from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources for your pea gravel blanket project, and if so, which one. Please go through and answer each question. This will help you determine which permit you will need.

Question 1 :

Are you a riparian?

If your answer is "Yes,” go to Question 2.

If your answer is "No,” :

You've answered No:

You are not eligible for a Section 30.12 structure permit.

Question 2 :

Will the project be located in an area determined to be a Public Rights Feature (PRF)?

If your answer is "Yes,” :

You've answered Yes:

Pea gravel cannot be placed in a Public Rights Feature under a general permit. To apply for an individual permit, please visit the individual permits page.*Please note: WAMS ID and password required to apply. If you do not have a WAMS ID, you must register for one before proceeding.

Please note that there are additional permit standards you must meet before the department may approve the permit. Please review the additional standards, found in the department’s checklist [PDF] before applying for a permit.

If your answer is "No,” go to Question 2.

If your answer is "I don't know,” :

You've answered I don't know:

Please use the designated waters tutorial to determine if your project is located in a Public Rights Feature (PRF).

Question 3 :

Is the project located in an area determined to be an Area of Special Natural Resource Interest (ASNRI)?

If your answer is "Yes,” :

You've answered Yes:

Pea gravel cannot be placed in an Area of Special Natural Resource Interest (ASNRI) under a general permit. To apply for an individual permit, please visit the individual permits page.*Please note: WAMS ID and password needed to apply. If you do not have a WAMS ID, you must register for one before proceeding.

Please note that there are additional permit standards you must meet before the department may approve the permit. Please review the additional standards, found in the department’s checklist [PDF] before applying for a permit.

If your answer is "No,” go to Question 4.

If your answer is "I don't know,” :

You've answered I don't know:

Please use the designated waters tutorial to determine if your project is located in an Area of Special Natural Resource Interest (ASNRI).

Question 4 :

Will the pea gravel be placed in a lake, pond or flowage?

If your answer is "Yes,” go to Question 5.

If your answer is "No,” :

You've answered No:

The department only has general permits available for the placement of pea gravel in slow-moving water. Typically placement of pea gravel does not occur in streams or rivers and requires an individual permit. Please fill out and apply for an individual permit to place pea gravel in a river. To apply for an individual permit, please visit the individual permits page.*Please note: WAMS ID and password required to apply. If you do not have a WAMS ID, you must register for one before proceeding.

Please note that there are additional permit standards you must meet before the department may approve the permit. Please review the additional standards, found in the department’s checklist [PDF] before applying for a permit.

If your answer is "I don't know,” :

You've answered I don't know:

Water bodies listed here and in the Wisconsin Lakes book [PDF] are considered to be lakes or flowages.

Question 5 :

Will the pea gravel placed in an area of naturally occurring sand, rock or gravel bottom with no native aquatic plants present? Or is your muck depth less than 6 inches with no native aquatic plants present?

If your answer is "Yes,” :

You've answered Yes:

General Permits only allow for a one-time placement of pea gravel in mucky lake bed areas with no native aquatic plants present. If your lake bed is sand, rock or gravel, or you have less than 6 inches of muck, or you have native aquatic plants present, please fill out and apply for an individual permit to place pea gravel. To apply for an individual permit, please visit the individual permits page.*Please note: WAMS ID and password needed to apply. If you do not have a WAMS ID, you must register for one before proceeding.

Please note that there are additional permit standards you must meet before the department may approve the permit. Please review the additional standards, found in the department’s checklist [PDF] before applying for a permit.

If your answer is "No,” :

You've answered No:

You may qualify for a general pea gravel blanket permit. To apply for a General Permit, please visit the general permits page.*Please note: WAMS ID and password needed to apply. If you do not have a WAMS ID, you must register for one before proceeding.

Please note that there are additional permit standards you must meet before the department may approve the permit. Please review the additional standards, found in the department’s checklist [PDF] before applying for a permit.

Exemptions

  • There are no exemptions for pea gravel blanket.

Laws

Applicable statutes and codes include Section 30.12(3)(a)1, Wis. Stats. [PDF exit DNR] and Chapter NR 329, Wis. Adm. Code [PDF exit DNR].

Local permits and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers regulations may also apply. We advise you to contact your local zoning office and your regional U.S. Army Corps of Engineers office [exit DNR].